Me and Warren Buffett

Why am I losing my career ambitions?

I found this gem of a post while doing some research for a current post I’m working on. I actually never posted it, but by the¬†references in the post I must have written it in 2011. Just to honor my work, I’m going to post it largely unchanged, and then I’ll write an update and continuation next week. Enjoy ūüôā

By 2010 I’d be six years out of college, and I was sure to reside in a downtown high rise overlooking Central Park in New York City.¬† It would have been a result of my taking the business world by storm, and relentlessly chasing my dreams until I beat them into submission.¬† Actually, the exact plan was to move to Dallas after college, transfer to New York City, and then off to London.

The plan for success didn’t include what I would actually do, but I think ‘business’ was the common answer.¬† The answer wasn’t important at that point, but I knew I would be successful and that sounded like an ideal succession of cities to conquer!¬† This dream of my was formulated well in High School in 1999.¬† My parents recently reminded me of this and I had to laugh.

What’s Your Point?

You might have noticed my blogging activity has slowed to a trickle in the last few months and what used to be weekly blogs are lucky to occur even monthly. My time has mostly been taken up by work as I received a promotion and now manage a global team, but it’s also taken up heavily by our new renovation project – which is about 75% complete after six months. We’re finally getting to normalcy in our house as our kitchen is nearly complete, so I plan to get back to blogging.

However, there’s another reason my blogging has slowed: my wife and I are still mentally floating after we returned from our round the world trip last year (ok,¬†actually returned¬†Nov 2013, does that make it two years ago???).¬†We moved to Dallas, bought a house,¬†fully reentered the workforce, and are both quite busy with work, but we’re somehow lost. We’ve gone from a state of near total freedom back to work servitude and our minds won’t let us fully adapt.

I can’t remember the name of the¬†book I read it in, but a line that stuck in my head since was that it’s easier to never give freedom in the first place than to give freedom and then try¬†taking it away. We had freedom and we’ve voluntarily given it away, but for obvious reasons like we couldn’t be nomads forever and we didn’t have an endless amount of money to blow. However, we know the type of lifestyle we prefer, and now the challenge is making it happen.

What’s Your Point?

Is Getting Rich the Answer?

You know what I‚Äôm talking about when I say that, right?¬† We always talk about nice it would be to get rich – then we’d be happy, or then we’d finally do what we want, whether it’s quit the job you hate, travel the world, or pursue what makes you happy.¬† Getting rich must be the answer.

However, as the old saying goes, wish and one hand poop in the other and see which one gets filled first!

After I sent out the post about how Drake’s rich father handles money, another reader emailed me his story.¬† Basically, he’s rich now because he recently sold a business for millions, and now he’s trying to figure out what he wants to do with his life.¬† Here’s what he said – let’s break down each paragraph:
I have it pretty good and it’s hard to bitch about a job and work environment that you created but it definitely makes me ponder what I would want to do differently next time.  I know these things for certain:  I hate  commuting, but I don’t like  working from home all the time; I hate sitting in front of a computer all day, I like working out at lunch, I like being creative and building a real product, I like selling at first but hate the repetition of doing it over and over again.

Are you Afraid of Looking Poor?

One of our biggest motivators of buying things we can’t afford is the fear of looking poor.

How embarrassing it must have been for me to drive around in a 1993 white Chevy Lumina with a maroon interior – so embarrassing that I thought the better decision was to take out a $28,000 car loan just so I wouldn’t look poor anymore. But guess what, although I might have looked like I had money with the new car, now I was officially poor!

My car ran just fine, but I made excuses to justify buying a new car. I needed something more dependable – even though my trusty Chevy Lumina never left me stranded on a Dallas highway. It wasn’t the fear of a break down that fed my bad decision, but the fear of simply appearing poor.

Are you afraid of looking poor?

America, Hell Yeah.

As we gazed across the bay to the beautifully lit city of Hong Kong, I couldn’t help but notice the young man’s shoes as he walked in front of us. They weren’t the typical high-price Faragamo’s that are becoming normal in the ultra-affluent Hong Kong, instead they were simple canvas shoes decorated on the top with the US flag.