Lottery – we’ve all been fleeced!!

January 12, 2016 — 2 Comments

Wow, $1.5 billion dollars, can you imagine winning? We all already know our chances of winning are beyond minuscule – like we have a 2x greater chance of getting stuck in an elephant’s butt – but that won’t stop many of us from playing. I tend to be a bitter old man about this stuff because I know it’s a complete waste of money, but even I went in with some friends for a ticket on Saturday night!

After we didn’t win I refrained from being that guy who no one likes who says “I told you so” to something already so obvious. However, my old man bitterness reached a whole new high when I read this article on how the rules were changed back in August to make sure this exact thing happened!!!

According to think progress:

Under the new rules you select five of 69 numbers, up from five out of 59 numbers. The choices for the Powerball was actually reduced from 35 to 26. Still, this decreased the odds of winning the jackpot from 1 in 175 million to 1 in 292 million

Sure, it went from “no chance of winning the big one” to “really, no chance of winning the big one” but it’s the plan behind it that makes me want to write a mean letter to the lotto commission (kidding, I’m too lazy).

They wanted exactly what’s happening right now to happen. They wanted to hit the billion dollar mark:

At the time the rule changes were first floated in July, FiveThirtyEight estimated that the chances of a $1 billion prize pool increased from 8.5% to 63.4% over a given five year period.

And why would they want to hit the billion dollar mark? Because people lose their ever-loving minds!! It’s the talk around the water cooler, is mentioned on every news outlet and has people throwing away their hard earned money. It’s a self-filling pot of hopelessness fueled ever higher by all of the free press. They wanted this exact thing to happen and now have all of our attention.

This shit should be illegal.

But hey, it’s a great way to buy a $2 thrill – where else can you get that kind of adrenaline rush for that cheap besides maybe Thailand?

Or you could view it how it really is – a regressive tax on the poor:

“People in households earning under $40,000 accounted for 28 percent of South Carolina’s population but made up 54 percent of frequent players. Uneducated people also made up a disproportionate share.”

“But people should spend money however they want! If they want to be idiots than so be it”. Ok, but idiots shouldn’t promote it:

By the way, if anyone wins, can I have a cut????????

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2 responses to Lottery – we’ve all been fleeced!!

  1. >>
    People in households earning under $40,000 accounted for 28 percent of South Carolina’s population but made up 54 percent of frequent players. Uneducated people also made up a disproportionate share.”

    “But people should spend money however they want! If they want to be idiots than so be it”. Ok, but idiots shouldn’t promote it<<

    If someone has the money to play AND that money isn't due to being partly or wholly subsidized by the government (welfare, food stamps, Medicaid, etc.) then yes, they have every right to play. But if they aren't able or willing to support themselves and need governmental help to do so, then no they wouldn't be wasting the money they are being given to gamble. Amazing how some people think since it is 'only' $2 or whatever it isn't really gambling. Or they figure that it is helping seniors or whatever gets the earning of the lottery, aren't you already paying enough in taxes and if you really want to help the cause, just hand the money over directly to someone that can use it.

    I will admit that I am probably one of the very few that won't be playing. I don't gamble. I don't have money to waste.

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